One Yukkuri Place

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    EasyV

    What's going on here anyway.

    The strand of hair patting on the hand is cute by the way.

    EasyDeibu

    Tried matching symbols to tables out of curiosity. Is hard. Please check, if guessed correct.

    Top: Yutsu-yutsu
    Right: Piko-piko
    Left: Peshi-peshi
    Bottom: Pushu-pushu
    Syringe: Puzu

    Updated by EasyDeibu

    EasyV

    As a translator I'm aware of the sound effects you know ;P
    It didn't help at all when I looked at the picture the first time.
    Anyway, the "pusu" on the syringe can also be used to inject, not just suck, as far as I know (though all things considered, it's likely to be "suck").

    By the way, if you want to try your hand at translating, please check the dictionary first.
    It's not "yutsu", just "yu".

    Updated by EasyV

    EasyDeibu

    EasyV said:

    As a translator I'm aware of the sound effects you know ;P
    It didn't help at all when I looked at the picture the first time.
    Anyway, the "pusu" on the syringe can also be used to inject, not just suck, as far as I know (though all things considered, it's likely to be "suck").

    By the way, if you want to try your hand at translating, please check the dictionary first.
    It's not "yutsu", just "yu".

    Regarding this dictionary and tsu/っ hiragana. What I get from that link is

    Mister Dictionary said:

    The "little tsu" is abused by Yukkuri a lot. Normally it would "double" the next consonant (unless it's at the end of a sentence), but they use it even when it's not needed. This can make translation harder than it already is.

    But when I read about similar cases it usually means pause in pronunciation when not used as a sound. This can actually be reflected in translated sounds by adding things like "..." or spaces. That would maybe indicate more "laboured" yuing in many cases. In this picture right here, author even adds dotes to maybe make it look like even longer time intervals.

    EasyV

    EasyDeibu said:

    <snip>

    Yup, in fact the dictionary says "(unless it's at the end of a sentence)", which is this case, and, as you said, it's a special kind of pause (it's hard to explain in written form, at least for me).
    The point is, it's not "yutsu", but "yu" followed by a special kind of pause.
    I linked the whole dictionary because yukkuri abuse the language (ironically) a lot and in some cases the english translation is "improper" for one reason or another.

    TheodoricBlood

    EasyV said:

    What's going on here anyway.

    Custard extraction.

    EasyV said:

    The strand of hair patting on the hand is cute by the way.

    Hair use spreads to yukkuris with hair too short to use. Worthy of a flapping tag.

    EasyDeibu

    EasyV said:

    Yup, in fact the dictionary says "(unless it's at the end of a sentence)", which is this case, and, as you said, it's a special kind of pause (it's hard to explain in written form, at least for me).
    The point is, it's not "yutsu", but "yu" followed by a special kind of pause.
    I linked the whole dictionary because yukkuri abuse the language (ironically) a lot and in some cases the english translation is "improper" for one reason or another.

    So, what I'm trying to say, maybe translate them as dotes to give a sense of pause (and a feel of more laboured yuing). Here it will become "yu..." "yu..."

    EasyV

    EasyDeibu said:

    So, what I'm trying to say, maybe translate them as dotes to give a sense of pause (and a feel of more laboured yuing). Here it will become "yu..." "yu..."

    It's more like an exclamation mark than ellipsis in my opinion.
    At the end of a sentence it doesn't really work, but when you have e.g. "にんっしん", translating it as "preg!nant" is better than plain "pregnant".