One Yukkuri Place

sorry already

Posted under General

Life my friend. Life happen to them.

Maybe us illiterate peasant should try to make hard translation with Google trans. I wonder if that would work.

forum #10058
forum #10087

This is the third completely unproductive whining thread you've started on the subject. Shut the hell up.

It took me one month to learn what little Japanese I had when I started translating here. One month. And I have the IQ of a squirrel.

Get off your lazy anyaru and do it yourself if you want it so badly.

Merciless_Anony said:
Life my friend. Life happen to them.

Maybe us illiterate peasant should try to make hard translation with Google trans. I wonder if that would work.

While Google Translate and Weblio Translate are good references, machine translations are not the most reliable.

kevduckk said:
what happened to all the translators
also id be witting to make a translated version if someone would add a translation in the comment section

Making multiple threads of the same subject is a waste of time and space, as BaronMind had put bluntly.
I can do translations, but I just need to find some time to do so... and of course to continue with the Relay Manga!

For many of us, this is just a hobby, not a profession. It is to be expected only the truly dedicated would take this niche seriously.

(Also, my JP language proficiency has rusted down to Entry level due to disuse.) OTL

I tried that with the SY dialogue files. It came out like one of RealKillAllYukkuris posts.

^Lmao.

Also BaronMind where did you learn to read japanese from? I may have missed it if you already mentioned it somewhere. Interested in learning it in my spare time to maybe help translate.

Right here, more or less. There's a reason I can only read yu-speak. =|

I started out with some hiragana flash cards. I think I dug up a batch on Quizlet at first, but then I found a free program called kanatest that did the same thing. They're really easy to learn: a little over 40 characters, plus a few very consistent rules on combinations using smaller versions of them. This is what I meant when I said a month - the only difference between me and 99% of the others when I first came here was that I could read hiragana.

From there I really just started looking up sentences word-by-word in a Japanese-English dictionary. Helps if there's already a translated version to check against. Wiktionary is fine, plus there's tons of apps like Tagaini Jisho, Gjiten or Gwaei. Vocabulary is most of the work of learning a new language.

I read a few books (and a few Wikipedia pages) that explained the basics of grammar. Just looking up the common particles will tell you what you need to look for most of the time. The hardest bit to remember is the verb conjugation rules. They're not that hard, there's just a lot of them.

There are two things I kind of got stuck on. First is kanji. There's over 2000 of them. Learning them by themselves doesn't really help, except to learn how to type them so you can look up words that contain them. The words are what you really need to remember. I made myself some computer flash cards for IME input and vocabulary, but I haven't used them in ages.

The second is that Japanese people seem to have a phobia of saying what they actually mean. English is no different, really, but Japanese lets you just drop things completely without Mrs Grammar scolding you for not finishing your sentence. You need a lot of context.

...I'm going to stop typing now before I lose track of what I'm talking about. Again. Feel free to bug me if you think I can help with anything.

BaronMind said:

Right here, more or less. There's a reason I can only read yu-speak. =|

I started out with some hiragana flash cards. I think I dug up a batch on Quizlet at first, but then I found a free program called kanatest that did the same thing. They're really easy to learn: a little over 40 characters, plus a few very consistent rules on combinations using smaller versions of them. This is what I meant when I said a month - the only difference between me and 99% of the others when I first came here was that I could read hiragana.

From there I really just started looking up sentences word-by-word in a Japanese-English dictionary. Helps if there's already a translated version to check against. Wiktionary is fine, plus there's tons of apps like Tagaini Jisho, Gjiten or Gwaei. Vocabulary is most of the work of learning a new language.

I read a few books (and a few Wikipedia pages) that explained the basics of grammar. Just looking up the common particles will tell you what you need to look for most of the time. The hardest bit to remember is the verb conjugation rules. They're not that hard, there's just a lot of them.

There are two things I kind of got stuck on. First is kanji. There's over 2000 of them. Learning them by themselves doesn't really help, except to learn how to type them so you can look up words that contain them. The words are what you really need to remember. I made myself some computer flash cards for IME input and vocabulary, but I haven't used them in ages.

The second is that Japanese people seem to have a phobia of saying what they actually mean. English is no different, really, but Japanese lets you just drop things completely without Mrs Grammar scolding you for not finishing your sentence. You need a lot of context.

...I'm going to stop typing now before I lose track of what I'm talking about. Again. Feel free to bug me if you think I can help with anything.

Hey thanks man, wasn't expecting so much help tbh but it's all really appreciated. I'll see if I can't get started on those cards.
I get what you mean with the pronoun game, how japanese people can drop sentences so praying it doesn't catch me off guard too much.

Pronoun dropping is pretty easy to figure out. The main trick is to remember is that -wa is not the same as a subject in English. It helps if you read "...-wa" as "as for ...", especially when you have a true subject (-ga) at the same time, like "as for me, __ book was stolen". Then it's obvious what the missing pronoun is.

The real trouble is how indirect they like to be. My favourite example is the story of a Japanese-to-English translator changing the simple English phrase "I love you" to "When I'm with you, the moon is so beautiful".

They do that a lot.

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